(Source: babygirlscorner)

pretentious-fucker:

"Holy Fucking Shit: 40,000" by Have a Nice Life

It’s sort of weird if you think about it. We live in a pretty apathetic age, yet we’re surrounded by an enormous amount of information about other people. If you feel like it, you can easily gather that information about them. Having said that, we still hardly know anything about people.

Haruki Murakami, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage  (via larmoyante)

(Source: royhaylock)

(Source: johnnybravo20)

The Coolhouse at Singapore Botanic Gardens

by Ianception

tarkovskologist:

"Taxi Driver was very much Paul Schrader’s script. He wrote it over a period, I don’t know, I keep thinking maybe four, five weeks, three weeks maybe. He was in a very lonely state at the time, a very bad state of frame of mind as you can tell from the film. The loneliness, frustration, anxiety, fear. It’s all there. And, somehow, I connected with the material. Travis was an outsider. I thought of myself as an outsider. Maybe because I was a kid with asthma or whatever, I don’t know. I’ve always felt like that.  The anger and the rage are always there. Maybe it’s because of the way I grew up. I don’t know but it’s there. It was there with Schrader. It was there in Travis. And, in a way, I felt it was like an umbilical cord to me. I felt as if I just knew it intrinsically. And De Niro felt a similar way, although we never articulated it with Bob. He doesn’t have to talk about it. He does it, you see. And so it was a really perfect union of the three of us.
I don’t like a lot of violence in films, but it’s the way I grew up. I saw that sort of thing all the time. I knew that there was a double edge to violence, especially when you’re younger. There’s an excitement to it. But it’s really ugly and it’s bad and it’s wrong. I just saw it that way. Growing up I saw how undignified it was, but part of it was just a bunch of kids in the street being tough sometimes. That’s everywhere. That’s not just the Lower East Side. I saw things when I was eight or nine years old, you know, and it leaves an impression on you. And so I usually approach violence in as honest a way as possible and there’s no doubt about it. I’m not saying that a ten-year-old kid should see these films, you know. They shouldn’t. There should be some regulation. But I always stayed as true as I could to what I knew… I didn’t think the film would ever get anywhere. We were doing it as a labor of love.” — Martin Scorsese, Taxi Driver (1976)

(Source: livin-hip-hop)